Not Logged In Log In   Sign Up   Points Leaders
Follow Us    4:12 AM

Recent Gas News/GasBuddy Blog

27
votes
pump to homepage help
Schools warned of solar panel fire risk: Fears over free green scheme after three mystery blazes

Daily Mail -- British Gas has launched an investigation into solar panels at dozens of schools and businesses after a series of mystery fires.

Some 92 schools that signed up for free panels have been told their equipment will need improvements before it is considered safe to use.

It comes after solar panel fires in three schools were confirmed by British Gas following a tip-off to The Mail on Sunday.

Although an investigation after the first two was ruled 'inconclusive', it is believed the energy giant was forced to carry out improvements when a third roof blaze damaged two classrooms at Sutton Bonington Primary School in Nottinghamshire.

More than 90 schools and 27 business fitted with the suspect equipment have been left without free solar energy since April. The news is likely to come as a blow..  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy
30
votes
pump to homepage help
When Does a $5 Toll Cost $30? When You're Driving a Rental Car

Bloomberg Businessweek -- With the rise of “cashless” turnpikes, where tolls are collected via a device such as EZ-Pass rather than at tollbooths, rental car companies have found two ways to pass those costs on to their customers, both unpopular: Customers can choose to rent a pass for as much as $20 a day, which they’ll pay whether or not they pass through a toll plaza, or they can pay the fines for going through the lanes without a pass, plus a hefty processing fee tacked on by the rental company.

Customers are ticked at what seems like yet another charge, like fees for checked baggage. After a Florida Dollar Rent a Car added $30 in administrative fees to a bill for $2.74 in tolls, Roxanna Usher of Redwood Valley, Calif., vented her spleen on the entire state. “I’m angry beyond belief ..."  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
51 Comments
Not Newsworthy
22
votes
pump to homepage help
Oil prices climb buoyed by mounting Ukraine crisis

Arab Times -- LONDON, Aug 30, (AFP): Crude oil and wheat prices were lifted this week by intensifying concerns over the Ukraine crisis, while gold advanced as many investors sought shelter from geopolitical tensions. Many commodities also rose on bright economic growth data in the United States, a top consumer of many raw materials including crude oil. The country’s economy expanded at an annual rate of 4.2 percent in the second quarter, up from the prior growth estimate of 4.0 percent, official data showed.

Oil: Global oil prices climbed this week, supported by renewed Russia-Ukraine tensions and stronger-than-expected US economic growth, analysts said. The market also gained ground this week on the back of elevated supply risks linked to simmering tensions in oil producers Iraq and Libya.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
25 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
Wall St Week Ahead-US coal stocks could gain on Russia tension

Gulf News- -- New York: Beaten-down US coal company stocks may receive a lift in coming weeks if deteriorating relations between Russia and the West push President Vladimir Putin to shut off Europe’s natural gas supply.

The crisis in eastern Ukraine has emboldened Europe and the United States to impose broad sanctions on Russia. But Europe finds itself in a precarious position, with almost a third of the natural gas the continent consumed in 2013 flowing from Russia, according to the US Energy Information Administration.

Europe’s heightened concerns about energy security could provide an opportunity for US coal companies, which have been hurt by declining domestic consumption, to step in and fill the gap as winter approaches. More than half of US coal exports already reach Europe.
 (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
16 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
The power of salt: Power generation from where river water and seawater meet

Science Daily -- Where the river meets the sea, there is the potential to harness a significant amount of renewable energy, according to a team of mechanical engineers. The researchers evaluated an emerging method of power generation called pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), in which two streams of different salinity are mixed to produce energy. In principle, a PRO system would take in river water and seawater on either side of a semi-permeable membrane. Through osmosis, water from the less-salty stream would cross the membrane to a pre-pressurized saltier side, creating a flow that can be sent through a turbine to recover power.

 (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
54 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
Secretive Company Claims Battery Breakthrough

Scientific American -- Two of the most sacred numbers in the electric-vehicle industry are 300 miles and $100. The first is generally considered to be the distance electric cars need to travel on a single charge for Americans to take them seriously. The second is the cost, per kilowatt-hour, to which batteries need to drop before EVs can compete with gas-powered cars on sticker price.

Sakti3, a Michigan startup that auto-industry insiders have been whispering about for years, says it might soon hit those two sacred targets. The company has long been in semi-stealth mode, talking to the press but offering few particulars about its technology. Now, Ann Marie Sastry, co-founder and CEO of the company, tells me that the company’s prototype solid-state lithium battery cells have reached a record energy density ...  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
23 Comments
Not Newsworthy
27
votes
pump to homepage help
Nuclear Waste Is Allowed Above Ground Indefinitely

NYTimes -- As the country struggles to find a place to bury spent nuclear fuel, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has decided that nuclear waste from power plants can be stored above ground in containers that can be maintained and guarded indefinitely.

The decision, in a unanimous vote of the commission on Tuesday, means that new nuclear plants can be built and old ones can expand their operations despite the lack of a long-term plan for disposing of the waste.

The chairwoman of the commission, who voted with the majority but dissented on certain aspects, said Friday that the vote risked allowing Congress to ignore the long-term problem.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
11 Comments
Not Newsworthy
27
votes
pump to homepage help
Bingham wind energy project wins preliminary approval from Maine environmental regulators

Bangor Daily News -- PORTLAND, Maine — State regulators are prepared to give final approval for a 62-turbine wind farm in Bingham, which would be the largest so far approved in the state.

The Maine Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday issued a draft order approving the project, proposed by a subsidiary of the Boston-based firm First Wind. That order will be subject to public comment and further review before final approval can be granted for the proposed $398 million project by Blue Sky West LLC and Blue Sky West II LLC.

The 186-megawatt project is another focal point for wind industry supporters and opponents. Supporters say it will bring economic development and reliability to the region’s power grid; opponents of the project challenge the amount the DEP has asked First Wind to provide to  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
4 Comments
Not Newsworthy
37
votes
pump to homepage help
Kurdish tanker carrying $100 million in oil disappears from radar off Texas coast

Daily News -- A Kurdish tanker loaded with $100 million worth of oil vanished off Texas' coast Thursday.

Radar systems showed no signs of the United Kalavrvta cargo ship, which has been at the center of a long legal battle between Iraq's government and the country's Kurdish region.

The ship, which was 95% full and carrying 1 million barrels of disputed crude, was on its way to Galveston when it mysteriously went dark Thursday night. Iraq and Iraqi Kurdistan each claim the oil onboard as its own.

Baghdad — which claims to have the exclusive right to export crude oil from Iraq — filed a lawsuit in American courts demanding U.S. Marshals seize the oil when it reaches Galveston.

The Kurdish Regional Government, Iraq claimed, has no right to control crude. The Kurds say exporting oil is crucial to the r  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
90 Comments
Not Newsworthy
25
votes
pump to homepage help
Teen Drivers: Distracted and Dangerous, A New Report Finds

Forbes -- “Teens have the highest crash risk of any age group, and research confirms that distraction is often a factor,” Jonathan Adkins, the group’s executive director, said in a statement. And the risk of being involved in a fatal distracted driving crash remains high throughout a driver’s twenties  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
22 Comments
Not Newsworthy
35
votes
pump to homepage help
EDITORIAL: Make the holiday a break -- not a DUI heartbreaker

The Fresno Bee -- The August headlines in The Bee have hit the Valley like a punch to the gut.

"Man pleads guilty to killing 3 sisters."

"Woman gets prison for death: Hit-run crash killed Clovis man in 2011."

"Meth linked to fatal crash in Fresno: Woman is accused of DUI in stolen SUV."

All these tragedies had one thing in common: innocent people died because someone was driving — or was suspected of driving — while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

As we party and travel on this Labor Day weekend, a three-day holiday noted for a spike in DUI arrests, law enforcement agencies Valleywide are warning that they are on a maximum-enforcement period ending Monday at midnight.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
217 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Smuggled oil could fund ISIS beyond the battles of Iraq

Haynesville.com -- The Islamic State, also known by their older name, ISIS, has systematically attempted (and on some fronts succeeded) to take over prominent infrastructure and resources throughout Iraq. Last month’s capture of the Mosul hydroelectric dam by the jihadists caused panic that electricity and water would be cut off, or worse, a complete destruction of the dam which would have caused many deaths in the region.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
266 Comments
Not Newsworthy
28
votes
pump to homepage help
Coal is not top issue for most WV voters

CharlestonDailyMail -- The future of the coal industry isn’t the top priority for the vast majority of West Virginians likely to vote to send someone to Congress this year, according to a new West Virginia Poll.

A little more than 16 percent of people polled chose “the future of coal” among seven other options when asked what issue “is the most important to your vote for Congress this year?” Only 10 percent said it was the second most important issue to their vote.

Unemployment and jobs, health care and the federal budget all registered as higher priorities for the 401 people polled. R.L. Repass conducts the West Virginia Poll for the Charleston Daily Mail.

Much of the political advertising from West Virginia’s Democrat and Republican candidates for federal office has in some way focused on coal or criticize  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
10 Comments
Not Newsworthy
30
votes
pump to homepage help
Flying a Blimp Is Way Trickier Than You’d Expect

Wired -- Goodyear’s newest airship, just christened Wingfoot One, is now cruising the skies in all its newfangled glory. From the ground, the redesigned dirigible doesn’t look that different—it’s bigger, sure, but not much else. Not so from the cockpit. “From a pilot’s standpoint, it’s a night-and-day difference from the old model to the new airship that we’re flying,” says Goodyear pilot Derek Reid.

Pilots flying the old model operate a wheel and rudder system, like old-timey boat captains. The new model feels more like a videogame, with a joystick controlling pitch and yaw. A control panel displays electronic feedback from all flight control surfaces, and vectored engines can swivel in any direction, allowing the ship to take off and land like a helicopter and hover in place.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
10 Comments
Not Newsworthy
31
votes
pump to homepage help
California drivers brace for costly new gas tax

Fox News -- Californians already pay the nation's second highest gas tax at 68 cents a gallon -- and now it will go up again in January to pay for a first-in-the-nation climate change law.

"I didn't know that," said Los Angeles motorist Tyler Rich. "It's ridiculous."

"I think it’s terrible," added Lupe Sanchez, pumping $4.09-a-gallon gas at a Chevron near Santa Monica. "The economy, the way it is right now with jobs and everything, it's just crazy."

When gas prices go up, motorists typically blame oil companies, Arab sheiks and Wall Street speculators. This time they can blame Sacramento and former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger for passing a bill requiring California to reduce carbon emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

The tax on carbon already raised about $1 billion in revenue by requiring m  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
227 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Microgrids Are Coming

Motley Fool -- As the cost of solar energy has fallen, it has opened up new markets that were once unimaginable in energy. Five years ago, it seemed impossible that a million homes in the U.S. could be powered by solar energy, but that's the goal of just one company -- SolarCity -- and it hopes to accomplish this goal by 2018.

As the cost of solar energy falls and new technologies like energy storage, smart meters, and demand response advance, new opportunities open up, like microgrids, which can create a self contained energy ecosystem. If designed right, microgrids can produce more renewable energy, cause less strain on the grid, and even provide technology that could change energy around the world.

What's a microgrid?
A microgrid is an electric grid that is much smaller than a city, state, or nat  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
27 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall — but only the most desperate are fleeing

WashingtonPost -- For 51 years he’d lived in the same hollow and for two decades he’d performed the same job, mining coal from the underground seams of southern West Virginia. Then, on June 30, Michael Estep was jobless. His mine shut down, and its operator said “market conditions” made coal production unviable.

What has come since, for Estep, stands as the new Central Appalachian economic experience: a job-hunt in a region whose sustaining industry is in an unprecedented freefall. “I don’t know what to do,” Estep said as unpaid bills piled up, his cable cut to black, and his wife withdrew the last $7 from a checking account they’d held for 20 years.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
17 Comments
Not Newsworthy
22
votes
pump to homepage help
Half Of India’s Coal Plants Could Run Out Of Fuel In Under A Week

DailyCaller -- India is in the middle of an energy crisis. About half of the country’s coal-fired power plants only have less than a week’s supply of fuel for electricity generation, meaning the country could be hit with severe blackouts.

India’s Central Electricity Authority (CEA) accessed by Reuters showed “that 50 of India’s 100 thermal power stations had enough coal to last less than seven days. Taken as a whole, India’s thermal power generators have six days of supplies — far short of the 15-30 days set as an operating norm by the CEA.”

India’s state-run power sector has long suffered from numerous inefficiencies and corruption, but this year’s weak monsoon season has forced the country to cut back on hydroelectric power generation.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy
35
votes
pump to homepage help
If Unions Are Breaking Automakers, Why Are BMW and Mercedes So Rich?

Yes Magazine -- When the financial crisis of 2008 sent U.S. automakers to the precipice of failure, conservatives, notably Mitt Romney, urged the Obama administration to let the car companies go bankrupt. Neoconservatives blamed “high wages” paid to unionized autoworkers for the inability of GM, Ford, and Chrysler to compete. In his book The Crash of 2016, author Thom Hartmann points out a flaw in the argument that high wages to American workers are the problem. He says: Actually, Germany paid their autoworkers about $67 an hour (including wages and benefits). But the United States paid its average worker only $33 an hour (also including wages and benefits). On top of that, German car manufacturers were highly profitable, despite the comparatively large paychecks of their workers. BMW earned a before-tax  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
49 Comments
Not Newsworthy
29
votes
pump to homepage help
Gas drilling company withdraws application for forced pooling in Western Pennsylvania

Tribune Review -- A fight over whether a Texas company can drill for oil and gas in Western Pennsylvania without consent from some landowners ended on Friday, a state regulator said, when the company withdrew its application for forced pooling.

Hilcorp Energy Co. of Houston had reached agreements with most owners of gas rights in Lawrence and Mercer counties where it wants to drill, and asked the state Department of Environmental Protection for access to gas under remaining properties as part of a 1961 law that it claimed allows the practice.

Hilcorp said it withdrew its application with the DEP “in order to move forward with development operations and in keeping with the best interests of its lessors.”

Morgan Wagner, a DEP spokeswoman, said Hilcorp filed written notice to withdraw its application, an  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
13 Comments
Not Newsworthy
20
votes
pump to homepage help
EPA Looking to Expand - Again?

The Daily Signal -- BISMARCK, N.D. — A map developed by the EPA and released to a U.S. House committee investigating controversial proposed water regulations should have citizens concerned, says U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer. “It is certainly alarming the EPA would develop these maps in secret and only release them after being confronted by members of Congress,”  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
21 Comments
Not Newsworthy
35
votes
pump to homepage help
Online list IDs water wells harmed by drilling

The Wll Street Journal -- PITTSBURGH — Six years into a natural gas boom, Pennsylvania has for the first time released details of 243 cases in which companies prospecting for oil or gas were found by state regulators to have contaminated private drinking water wells.

The Department of Environmental Protection on Thursday posted online links to the documents after the agency conducted a "thorough review" of paper files stored among its regional offices. The Associated Press and other news outlets have filed lawsuits and numerous open-records requests over the last several years seeking records of the DEP's investigations into gas-drilling complaints.

Pennsylvania's auditor general said in a report last month that DEP's system for
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
18 Comments
Not Newsworthy
25
votes
pump to homepage help
Building a Tesla

Tesla --
TESLA Assembly plant, Fremont, California Fascinating
Watch this and you'll better understand why manufacturing jobs will never be what they once were.

http://www.youtube.com/embed/8_lfxPI5ObM?rel=0  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
18 Comments
Not Newsworthy
31
votes
pump to homepage help
10 green cars that don’t suck

Yahoo! Autos (from Car and Driver) -- Mix pious intentions with dreary mechanical bits and then stir in some driving misery, and the result is a “green car.” Green not in the color of its paint, but in the environmental virtue of its engineering and marketing. Green as in economical with fuel but stingy on fun, great with emissions but lousy to pilot. Green cars are hybrids, diesels, and electric cars stripped to the point of making a rotted ox cart seem luxurious. Except that was then—you know, like, three years ago—and this is the green car now.

Audi A3 TDI Diesel
BMW i3
BMW i8
Chevrolet Corvette Stingray
Chevrolet Spark EV
Ford Fusion Energi Plug-In Hybrid
Honda Accord Hybrid
Porsche 918 Spyder
Tesla Model S
Volkswagen Golf TDI Diesel  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
37 Comments
Not Newsworthy
23
votes
pump to homepage help
Coolest Camper Ever

Fox News -- It might not be the first thing you look for when you open up Chrysler's Mopar parts catalog, but when you think about it, an off-road camper for your Jeep makes a lot of sense.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy
37
votes
pump to homepage help
Los Angeles cops do not need to hand over license plate reader data, judge finds

Ars Technica -- A Los Angeles Superior Court judge will not force local law enforcement to release a week’s worth of all captured automated license plate reader (ALPR, also known as LPR) data to two activist groups that had sued for the release of the information, according to a decision issued on Thursday.

In May 2013 the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and the Electronic Frontier Foundation sued the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) and the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department (LASD) in an attempt to compel the agencies to release a week’s worth of LPR data from a certain week in August 2012. The organizations have not determined yet whether they will file an appeal.

The organizations had claimed that these agencies were required to disclose the data under the California Public...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
37 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
Toyota Fuel Cell Sedan Price, Tesla Battery Cost, Lighter Cars: Today's Car News

GreenCar -- Tesla Motors - Model S lithium-ion battery pack
Today we look, both directly and indirectly, at Tesla's future.

See why the Toyota hydrogen fuel-cell sedan could target the Model S, and how the electric-car maker's battery "Gigafactory" could get prices down to $100 per kilowatt-hour.

Meanwhile, the internal-combustion car still has some life in it, according to a survey of automotive engineers who believe the best path to fuel efficiency in the short term will be simply making cars lighter. All this and more on Green Car Reports.

Will Tesla's battery gigafactory achieve the ultimate electric-car goal of $100 per kilowatt-hour?

Find out why natural-gas powered long-haul semi-trucks aren't selling better.

Chinese carmaker BYD's rising electric car sales are swamped by gasoline models.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
22 Comments
Not Newsworthy
40
votes
pump to homepage help
2015 Ford F-150 SFE: Highest Gas Mileage Model For Aluminum Pickup

GreenCar -- Ford spokesman Mike Levine later confirmed that the SFE option will be available for the XL and XLT trim levels, which together make up 70 percent of total F-150 sales.

It will also be offered on two different body styles: regular cab and SuperCab, he said.

Trucks equipped with the SFE package will ride on 17-inch wheels and tires, among the smallest available on any full-size pickup on the market today.

The engine used for the SFE option will be the new, smaller 2.7-liter EcoBoost direct-injected and twin-turbocharged V-6 that will launch on the 2015 F-150.

That engine is rated at 325 horsepower and 375 lb-ft of torque, Ford says, and is likely to make up 28 percent of sales....
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
29 Comments
Not Newsworthy
34
votes
pump to homepage help
Honda introduces car designed just for women

NBC Today Money. -- This is a follow up to a previously posted article "Will Cars of the Future be Designed for Women Only?.
The auto industry has traditionally been male-dominated but Honda has rolled out a new model it claims to have specifically designed with women in mind.
The new Honda Fit She’s is a pretty-in-pink version of the maker’s familiar subcompact that offers a few niceties the maker believes will specifically appeal to distaff buyers, such as a windshield designed to block skin-wrinkling ultraviolet rays. But will women actually care? While the new Honda subcompact may be the only car currently on the road specifically targeting women there’s a good reason. Previous feminine offerings, such as the old Dodge LaFemme, met with little more than indifference and, in some cases, outright hostile.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
53 Comments
Not Newsworthy
35
votes
pump to homepage help
The City With the Highest Priced Gas in America

24/7 Wall St -- The average price for a gallon of regular gasoline in the United States is $3.43, down from $3.56 a year ago. But elements ranging from refinery locations to local taxes have caused prices to stay much higher in some areas. Among American cities, the one with the highest price is Honolulu at $4.24.

 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
42 Comments
Not Newsworthy
29
votes
pump to homepage help
Oil And Gas Industry Fueling Jobs For Labor Day Weekend

Forbes -- The energy industry is giving the economy the spark that it needs this Labor Day weekend — an upsurge fueled by the increase in shale oil and shale gas production. The boost is creating jobs and economic openings, while keeping a lid on gas prices in turbulent times.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
15 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
Cars and trucks we can't have...but definitely want.

Fox News -- If it's tough enough for Siberia, suburbia would have no chance. The Chevrolet Niva concept previews the next generation of its Russian-built compact SUV. Smaller than the upcoming Jeep Renegade, the Niva will be powered by a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine and feature a 5-speed stick and locking 4x4 system. Equipped with a snorkel, winch, roof lights and cargo racks, the tough little trucklet looks the business, but likely still can't bridge the divide between the U.S. and Russia -- due to safety and emissions regulations, not politics -- so don't expect it to cross the Bering Strait into showrooms when it goes on sale in 2016. (Chevrolet)  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
39
votes
pump to homepage help
Is it time for higher speed limits on Canada's highways?

MSN News -- In BC, the speed limits are rising on 850mi this summer — in a few cases up to 75MPH

QC is exploring the idea of variable speed limits — as high as 75 but only when the weather's good — as part of a pilot project

Some ON motorists have mounted a campaign to roll along at up to 80 MPH on some of the better highways. "Our mission is basically to legalize the existing speeds on our roads

So far there is no interest from the provincial MoT, and some provinces are even trying to slow things down

Drivers outside Regina and Saskatoon are having to take their feet off after the limit was dropped to 55MPH

Across Canada, motorists can be forgiven for being confused: a speed that's deemed to be just fine on a nice 4-6 lane straightaway in one province could result in fines in others

Determini  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy
40
votes
pump to homepage help
America's cheapest gas is in this town

CNN -- You think the gas near you is getting cheaper? Try filling up in the South Carolina city of Rock Hill.
That's the market with the nation's lowest gas price heading into Labor Day weekend -- an average of $3.09 a gallon, according to industry observer GasBuddy.com.

The good news for drivers is that prices like that could come soon to a station near you -- as long as you don't live on the West Coast or some other pockets of high-priced gas.
The nationwide average price stands at $3.44 a gallon, down about eight cents from a month ago and nearly 12 cents from this time last year.
The summer driving season will end with the cheapest Labor Day gas prices since 2010. And prices will drop even further when stations stop selling the more expensive summer blends of gasoline in late September.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
37 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Google's Project Wing building drone delivery service

PCWorld -- For two years, Google has quietly been developing autonomous flying vehicles that can be used to deliver packages for disaster relief or for commerce purposes, the company revealed Thursday.

The program, dubbed Project Wing, has been housed under Google X, the company’s secretive facility where it created other projects like Google Glass and its self-driving cars.

“Self-flying vehicles could open up entirely new approaches to moving goods—including options that are cheaper, faster, less wasteful and more environmentally sensitive than what’s possible today,” the company says in a document describing the effort.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
29 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Colorado Drillers Show Sensitive Side to Woo Fracking Foes

Bloomberg -- A fight over fracking is looming in Texas. Another stand-off is shaping up in Colorado. Yet drillers’ reactions couldn’t be more different  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
21 Comments
Not Newsworthy
32
votes
pump to homepage help
Will Cars of the Future be Designed for Women Only?

Forbes -- When Nissan’s CEO Carlos Ghosn told the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan at the end of July 2014 that women’s increasing influence on the automotive industry was one of the four major trends shaping the global car business, the other auto makers probably felt he had revealed their secret, as the whole industry is pointing to women.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
39 Comments
Not Newsworthy
42
votes
pump to homepage help
America runs on bacon, and so does this motorcycle

CNBC --

Hormel has created a custom motorcycle that runs on 100 percent refined bacon grease. The bike is part of a marketing effort to promote Hormel's Black Label brand, and an entire story around the marketing stunt from ad agency BBDO can be found at BaconBike.com.

Why a bacon bike?

"It was more like, 'Why wouldn't you do that?'" said Steve Venenga, Hormel VP of new products marketing. "I mean, it was such a great idea."

Hormel is hoping to make inroads against market leader Oscar Mayer, part of Kraft. The company's shares have outperformed Kraft over the last year, and Hormel beat Street estimates last quarter, giving partial credit to strong pork demand and margins.

"Bacon is in more households," said Venenga, even as prices are 9 percent higher than they were a year ago. Price increas  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
57 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Oil train regulation passes in California

Reuters -- SANFRANCISO (Reuters) - California lawmakers on Friday passed legislation requiring railroad companies to tell emergency officials when crude oil trains will chug through the state.

The bill would require railroads to notify the state's Office of Emergency Services when trains carrying crude oil from Canada and North Dakota are headed to refineries in the most populous U.S. state.

It passed its final vote in the Assembly 61-1, with strong bipartisan support in the state legislature in Sacramento. The bill now goes to Democratic Governor Jerry Brown for his signature.

“We have a spotlight on this issue because of the seriousness of the risk to public safety that it presents,” said the bill's author, Democratic Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, whose district encompasses parts of Sacramento a  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
33 Comments
Not Newsworthy
57
votes
pump to homepage help
Waldo, FL Police Admit to Required 'Quota' for Aggressive Ticketing

GasBuddy Blog -- Anyone who has received a speeding ticket in Waldo has probably suspected that officers were acting under a quota.  A remote stretch of highway 301 has nearly half a dozen speed changes in less than two miles; and Waldo police have pounced on unsuspecting tourists and out-of-towners for decades. Put simply, Waldo is a Florida embarrassment.  As it turns out, finally, there's proof that a quota has been standard operating procedure for years and the illegal actions there warrant investigation and prosecution. The Gainesville Sun is reporting that five of the seven officers with the Waldo Police Department have told city leaders that police Chief Mike Szabo required officers to write a speeding ticket during every hour of their shifts. Quotas are illegal. ...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
PD
1596 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
The world's strangest parking lots

MSN -- Brilliant and bizarre creations of space that go way beyond just serving the utilitarian purpose of providing a parking spot  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
39 Comments
Not Newsworthy
48
votes
pump to homepage help
Refinery-inspection bill protects trade secrets

NewsOK-AP -- The state Assembly has advanced legislation that would allow government regulators to monitor oil refinery shutdowns in response to a fire at Chevron's Richmond refinery in 2012. It also would allow oil companies to designate the information as a "trade secret."

SB1300 by Democratic Sen. Loni Hancock of Berkeley would protect information submitted to state officials from disclosure under the California Public Records Act.

The Assembly approved the bill on a 55-4 vote late Friday, sending it to the Senate.

Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner, another Berkeley Democrat, told lawmakers the bill does not change existing public records laws.

But media groups that oppose it say SB1300 would allow an oil refinery to challenge the release of documents and take anyone requesting them to court and...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
50 Comments
Not Newsworthy
41
votes
pump to homepage help
China's Shale Gas Bust

MIT Technology Review -- China is finding it harder than it expected to unlock a shale gas boom like the one in North America, calling into question its lofty goals to use natural gas to help clean up its air and control the growth of greenhouse gas emissions. Citing complicated geology and high production costs, the Chinese government has cut its ambitious 2020 target for shale gas development roughly in half.

In 2013 China became the third biggest user of natural gas behind the United States and Russia, consuming 166 billion cubic meters (bcm). By 2019, the International Energy Agency expects China’s annual natural gas consumption to grow 90 percent, to 315 bcm. Half of that increase is expected to be supplied by domestic gas production, which would come from multiple sources, including shale reserves.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
41 Comments
Not Newsworthy
46
votes
pump to homepage help
Regulators approve $160 million Enbridge Energy pipeline upgrade

Bakken -- Minnesota regulators on Thursday gave the go-ahead for a $160 million upgrade to a Canadian energy company’s crude oil pipeline across northern Minnesota, disappointing anti-pipeline activists who oppose development of that nation’s oil-sands deposits.
The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission approved the project on a 4-1 vote after six hours of testimony and discussion. The outcome was a victory for Enbridge Energy, the Calgary-based pipeline company that finished building the 1,000-mile Alberta Clipper pipeline four years ago and proposed to add pumping stations to increase its capacity from 570,000 to 800,000 barrels per day.
“We can now move forward with helping Minnesota improve its economy by supplying jobs and the economic spillover from that, as well as move our nation toward ener  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
38 Comments
Not Newsworthy
61
votes
pump to homepage help
Progress on a Powerful New Way to Generate Electricity

MIT Technology Review -- A powerful new way to generate electricity could eventually make electric cars and electronic gadgets run longer.

About four years ago, researchers in Michael Strano’s chemical engineering lab at MIT coated a short piece of yarn made of carbon nanotubes with TNT and lit one end with a laser. It sparkled and burned like a fuse, demonstrating a new way to generate electricity that produces phenomenal amounts of power.

At the time, no one understood how it worked, and it was so inefficient that it was little more than a “laboratory curiosity,” Strano says.

Now, Strano has figured out the underlying physics, which has helped his team improve efficiencies dramatically—by 10,000 times—and charted a path for continued rapid improvements.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
893 Comments
Not Newsworthy
54
votes
pump to homepage help
54.5 mpg: Why our measure of fuel economy is wrong

Chicago Tribune -- 54.5 miles per gallon. That is the target fuel efficiency for all light-duty vehicles by model year 2025. Yet if you’ve gone car shopping lately, you’ve noticed that the combined mpg is nowhere near that target. The average fuel economy of all new cars sold was 25.6 mpg as of July 2014.

That’s a huge gap. While average fuel economy continues to improve, the target benchmark seems impossible to reach.

That’s because we’re looking at two different measurements of fuel economy.

The lofty 54.5 mpg target that is commonly understood and reported by media is the UNADJUSTED value. The real number we see on window stickers and that are reported by our fuel gauges is the ADJUSTED value.

For those of you keeping score at home, the ADJUSTED target—the one that matters...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
58 Comments
Not Newsworthy
37
votes
pump to homepage help
Gas-Rich Marcellus Drilling Boosts Rigs to 5-Month High

Bloomberg -- Rigs targeting natural gas in the U.S. rose to the highest level in five months after those drilling horizontally for the fuel gained in the Marcellus formation of the eastern U.S.

Gas rigs jumped by eight to 338, the highest level since March 14, data posted on Baker Hughes Inc. (BHI)’s website show. The oil count rose by 11 to 1,575 after sliding by 25 last week, the Houston-based field services company said. The Marcellus formation, the nation’s biggest onshore gas play, added the most rigs gaining five drilling horizontally for gas and raising its total count to a two-month high.

The energy rig count is surging in the U.S. as producers use horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to draw record volumes of oil and gas out of shale formations from North Dakota to Texas. The boom...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
49
votes
pump to homepage help
Austin, Texas Passes a New Law Making Solar a ‘Default’ Generation Resource

GreenTech -- The city of Austin may have just single-handedly propelled the Texas solar market into the top-ten leading states.

Last night, the Austin city council voted in favor of a resolution that would increase the city's rooftop and utility-scale solar targets by 800 megawatts over the coming years.

It creates a plan that would build a small paradise for distributed energy companies, including a utility-scale solar target of 600 megawatts by 2017, a rooftop solar target of 200 megawatts by 2020, explicit language enabling third-party solar ownership, a floor price for the value-of-solar tariff, and a mandatory strategy to procure 200 megawatts of fast-response storage.

The plan builds upon earlier climate goals created and revised since 2010. After Austin Energy signed a power-purchase...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
33 Comments
Not Newsworthy
61
votes
pump to homepage help
Natural gas drives up revenue, alternative vehicles

Bakken -- Clay Clemmer filled up his company’s Chevrolet truck with compressed natural gas on Wednesday at Tyler’s new fueling station — First Alt Fuel.

Clemmer, 50, co-owner of the Granite Division Inc. in Tyler, bought the company’s first compressed natural gas (CNG) truck in December in anticipation of the fueling station opening in Tyler.

“We’re trying it out to see how it works,” Clemmer said. “It’s been good so far.”

The Granite Division is one of several businesses converting to vehicles that run on natural gas for efficiency and to save money.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
1249 Comments
Not Newsworthy
58
votes
pump to homepage help
Labor Day outlook in the Valley: Cheaper gas, plentiful campsites

The Fresno Bee -- Valley residents looking for a final summer getaway this Labor Day weekend have some good news: Gas prices are down a bit, and campsites in Yosemite and Sequoia-Kings Canyon national parks are still available.

Gas prices dropped slightly in the lead up to the Labor Day weekend. Thursday, the average gas price for a gallon of unleaded gasoline was $3.87 in Fresno and $3.83 in the Visalia-Tulare-Porterville area, according to AAA of Northern California.

AAA's Labor Day travel survey found that more than 3.9 million Californians will travel 50 miles or more during the holiday weekend, a 1.6% increase compared to last year.

"Californians are more optimistic about their financial situation, and consumer spending continues to outpace disposable income," Cynthia Harris said.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
452 Comments
Not Newsworthy
43
votes
pump to homepage help
With the Huracán, Lamborghini Finally Learns to Refine Itself

Wired -- A company founded on a lineage of irascible bulls has a certain reputation to uphold. A reputation for raw power, earwax-melting noise, and razor-edged looks. With a conceit like that, who has time for rationality?

In the case of Sant’Agata Bolognese-based Automobili Lamborghini, it’s corporate overseer Audi, that’s who. The German brand was behind the hugely successful Gallardo, which in its ten year run sold 14,022 units—half of Lamborghini’s all-time sales. Considering the stereotypical German love for structure and order, you can’t blame the Teutons for craving a smidge of consistency from the Italian brand.

Which brings us to the $237,250 Huracán LP 610-4, the successor to the now retired Gallardo that hit the road this spring. It’s a worthy replacement.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy